Highlights


Trade by Brent Denn Nosé
New creative nonfiction from a student at F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine in Bethesda, MD.

Interview with Dr. Andrea Wershof Schwartz
Read about our conversation with this inspiring poet, geriatrician, and one of the founding members of the Arts and Humanities Initiative at Harvard Medical School.

Poetry by Mina Le
Otolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon shares her early anatomy and operating room experiences in Soliloquy in Blue and Jackson Blue.

Interview with Atul Gawande
The award-winning author speaks to us about his life as a medical student, resident, surgeon, and writer.


3rd Annual Short Fiction Contest Winner


Amber Bard is a third year medical student at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Prior to entering medical school, she lived in Tokyo for three years, working as a writer and kindergarten teacher, before sailing around the southern hemisphere as the official newsletter writer for a Japanese cruise ship. She doesn't like sushi and she now gets seasick any time she looks at a boat.

Orchiectomy

by Amber Bard
        There have been a lot of medical students in the news lately for filling sham prescriptions on behalf of their teachers, the attending physicians who judge their daily performance in the hospitals and determine their futures with letters of recommendation or non-recommendation. Austin texts me links to the articles in the evening while I’m studying and he’s waiting for his friends in India to wake up and get online to play Call of Duty. I skim the articles silently and set my phone down, returning to my pathology textbook.
        “It’s too bad,” he says, watching me carefully to gauge my reaction.
        I nod and continue looking down at the book. Ulcerative colitis: Ulcers, Large intestine, Continuous, Colorectal cancer, Crypt abscesses, Extends proximally, Red diarrhea, Sclerosing cholangitis (ULCCCERS).
        “They’re idiots,” he says.
        I don’t respond. I don’t ask him why he’s Googling this subject.
        “You’d be more careful,” he says.



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